LAS VEGAS, NV - September 18: Efe Ajagba poses for portraits inside the bubble at the MGM Grand on September 18, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Mikey Williams/Top Rank Inc via Getty Images)

Boxer Efe Ajagba represents his Nigerian heritage with dignity, a badge of honor displayed each time he steps into the ring.  The fighter was born and raised in Ughelli in Delta State a place filled with contaminated water, limited electricity, and poor employment opportunities—on average, a worker might earn less than $1 (£0.63) a day.

 On the surface, boxing can mirror the desperation that Ajagba endured during his early years in Delta State. Early into a fighter’s career, paychecks range anywhere from $500 to $1,500 per fight, not to mention there are no promises of future success, although permanent damage is a reality.

So in this case, Ajagba was left with two options: to remain in Nigeria working in a bakery store or take his chance in boxing. “I discovered boxing in Nigeria. I would fight on the streets and always won, so I started boxing,” Ajagba told a news reporter, LIAM HAPPE. “Fighting on the streets is different to boxing. I had natural power. I wasn’t fighting a boxer. I would fight bodybuilders. So, I hit them, they fell. Boxing is different because fighters train every day to get in the ring,” said Ajagba.

The image of a fighter in boxing is significant, which can make a difference in how well a fighter performs. Then there is the surge in energy that the boxer gains in knowing that his opponent is terrified before he steps in the ring.

When it comes to image and Ajagba, the fighter has gained leverage. He is undefeated with a record of (15-0, 12 KOs); he is 6-foot-6, 240 pounds with freakish power. In 2018, Ajagba was set to fight Curtis Harper on national television until Harper became fearful and stepped out of the ring. 

Because of Harper’s cowardness, (see video at the end of this article) Ajagba earned the fastest victory in boxing history, a disqualification at one second in the first round.

Boxing is on average about the truth. In reality, the chances that Ajagba‘s future opponents will come out of the ring before the first bell are slim. Indeed, the more Ajagba has potential, the greater his risk will be against high-quality opposition, such as Frank Sanchez.

Sanchez is expected to give Ajagba his toughest test, and the oddsmakers have Sanchez the favorite to beat the 27-year-old Ajagba.  Sanchez is (18-0, 13 KOs) with speed and power.  The two will battle in a 10-round fight on the pay-per-view of the Tyson Fury-Deontay Wilder undercard at T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

If Ajagba (whose real name is Efetobor) pulls off the victory, his career will go in the right direction: increased exposure, bigger paychecks, and a serious contender for a world title.

Fury is currently considered the best heavyweight, and most expect him to defeat Wilder. Fury would prove too much for Ajagba at the moment, although if you listen to Ajagba‘s assessment of when he and Fury sparred, a Fury- Ajagba matchup might be of interest

“Tyson Fury can hit but doesn’t come close to my power. I punch harder than Tyson Fury,” Ajagba, who wanted to be a professional football player, told a news reporter. “…they [Fury’s team] brought me in because they believed I had the same knockout power like Wilder. The punches that he threw [Fury], I could take them. (But) he’s been in the game for years before he became world champion. He’s fought the top guys.”

At this stage in his career, the real fight for Ajagba might be fellow Nigerian Antony Joshua, who is coming off of a horrid performance in losing his titles to Oleksandr Usyk two weeks ago.

Several years ago, Ajagba told fighthype.com, “Me and Joshua both have the power. But skills control the power, and I have more skills,” he said. And he told James Dielhenn of Sky Sports.  “The best weapon of Joshua is the left hook and right uppercut. He doesn’t have a good jab.”

Outside of the physical advantages that both boxers would bring, Jousha- Ajagba would be appealing. Both could claim bragging rights as the best boxer, but there would be an added layer of motivation and satisfaction in proving who is the best Nigerian of the two.

 “You can’t say he’s [ Joshua] from Nigeran. From where I am from, nobody knows him [before he became world champion],” Ajagba told FightHype.com. “So when he became champion, everybody claim Nigeria [as their roots],” although Ajagba has verbalized a lot of respect for Joshua.

As an amateur, Ajagba won a gold medal at the 2015 African Games and bronze at the 2014 Commonwealth Games. If he defeats Sanchez, he will take home a secondary belt (which has little value in the sport) the WBC Continental America heavyweight title. Regardless of the value of the belt, what matters more to Ajagba is to focus on one goal. “I want to be the best heavyweight in the world… that’s my dream.”

Author

  • Spicy ray is the founder of the site and has a passion for writing developed in early childhood. His goal as a writer is to provide readers with inspiration, dedication, motivation, and critical thinking skills. He has a solid commitment to allowing writers to share their stories from a variety of backgrounds. He enjoys reading non-fiction, having tarot card readings, going to movies, and watching boxing in his free time.

Website | + posts

Spicy ray is the founder of the site and has a passion for writing developed in early childhood. His goal as a writer is to provide readers with inspiration, dedication, motivation, and critical thinking skills. He has a solid commitment to allowing writers to share their stories from a variety of backgrounds. He enjoys reading non-fiction, having tarot card readings, going to movies, and watching boxing in his free time.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here