Noor Mukadam

Last month, Noor Mukadam was murdered after law enforcement discovered her head was dismembered from her body.  She lived in Pakistan and was the daughter of ambassador Shaukhat Mukadam, a distinguished Pakistani diplomat and former envoy to South Korea and Ireland. 

Noor’s death brought to light the treatment many women in developing nations experience primarily because laws are lax, and women are disregarded beneath men even if the man is a total stranger to the woman.     According to reports, Mukadam was killed on July 20, and Jaffer was named the alleged perpetrator. 

The 30-year-old Jaffer was born into family wealth and had dual Pakistan-US citizenship. According to sources, Noor was brutalized in what’s known as block F7—a high-end neighborhood.

Noor’s father said he and his wife received a call from Jaffer informing them that Noor’s whereabouts were unknown.  And shortly thereafter, Noor’s father was asked by police to identified his daughter’s body. And that’s when police took Jaffer into custody and charged him with premeditated murder.  

Reports say Jaffer had some involvement in her death. His parents, Asmat Adamjee Jaffer and Zakir Jaffer, were arrested on charges of covering up evidence. Jaffer’s family owned one of the oldest family-run trading and project management companies in the country, a business that made them extremely wealthy.

There have been numerous examples of violence against women in developing nations for decades. In fact, there was a bill in 2016 granting men the right to “lightly beat” their wives.

“According to a 2020 country report from Human Rights Watch, around 28% of women between the ages of 15 and 49 have experienced physical violence since the age of 15,” wrote CNN author. “Pakistan’s Ministry of Human Rights said, citing the country’s Demographic and Health Survey from 2017-2018.”

Although it is unclear what the motive was behind Noor’s death, many women’s rights groups have asked that laws change when it comes to domestic violence against women;

There’s a push to pass the proposed Pakistan Domestic Violence (Prevention and Protection) Act. Offenders will be held accountable for abusing women, children, or vulnerable people by serving time in prison or receiving fines.

Since Noor’s death, there have been protests in cities worldwide, including Dublin, Los Angeles, New York, London, and Toronto, in her memory.

Noor older sister, Sara Mukadam, told CNN that she was a “beautiful person…she was here to change the world; she always talked about it. Her being my younger sister, I would brush her off and say, ‘What do you mean, you want to do something’?”

Her father added, “It’s not just the murder of my daughter. We have to have justice because (there are) implications… for all Pakistani people’s daughters.”

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  • Spicy ray is the founder of the site and has a passion for writing developed in early childhood. His goal as a writer is to provide readers with inspiration, dedication, motivation, and critical thinking skills. He has a solid commitment to allowing writers to share their stories from a variety of backgrounds. He enjoys reading non-fiction, having tarot card readings, going to movies, and watching boxing in his free time.

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Spicy ray is the founder of the site and has a passion for writing developed in early childhood. His goal as a writer is to provide readers with inspiration, dedication, motivation, and critical thinking skills. He has a solid commitment to allowing writers to share their stories from a variety of backgrounds. He enjoys reading non-fiction, having tarot card readings, going to movies, and watching boxing in his free time.

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